Pioneer Novell Course for 7 Colleges, Varsities

By : R.S. Kamini

2007/05/08

KUALA LUMPUR: A new information and communications technology certification programme has been introduced in seven colleges and universities.

The first of its kind programme focuses on an academic training programme for lecturers who will pass on the knowledge to their students.

The universities include INTI International University College, International Islamic University Malaysia, Multimedia University, Tunku Abdul Rahman College and the German-Malaysia Institute.

These universities signed a memorandum of understanding with US-based Novell Inc to have the software provider distribute authorised training materials and Suse Linux software licences at a subsidised rate.

Novell generally provides technical support, training, education and consultation for its software and the training is through a partnership between NCL Solutions Sdn Bhd and Novell Technical Institute at a subsidised rate of up to 80 per cent.
The training programme, which uses Suse Linux, a free open-source operating system, is considered a cheaper alternative compared with other operating systems.

According to Novell Asia Pacific president Maarten Koster, Suse Linux, distributed by Novell, helps universities cut cost tremendously and makes it affordable for students to learn.

"Universities can choose to include Suse Linux as part of their IT curriculum or introduce it as a separate course."

"Linux and open source are utilised more and more in public and private sectors in Malaysia, as well as the region," said Koster.

He said introducing Suse Linux system to universities worked in favour of Novell which wanted to play a role in training engineers equipped to handle open source information technology environment.

The training programme, added Koster, ran throughout the academic year and students would receive a certificate from Novell upon completion.

He added that students could also choose to sit for the internationally recognised Novell Certified Linux Professional certification, which was highly respected by worldwide IT vendors, employers and IT professionals.


originated by new straits times

Courses : Open Source Education at Subsidised Rates

2007/05/12

NOVELL has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with seven universities and institutes of higher learning in Malaysia to offer Open Source and Linux training as part of their information technology curriculum.

The schools that signed up for the programme are INTI International University College and INTI College Subang, Kolej Tunku Abdul Rahman College , Multimedia Universiti, i-Systems College Kuching, Centre for IT Advancement – International Islamic University Malaysia, Universiti Kuala Lumpur and German Malaysian Institute.

This academic training programme will be run together with NCL Solutions Sdn Bhd, Novell’s exclusive Novell Technical Institute (NTI) in Malaysia. Novell will provide the authorised training materials and SUSE Linux software licenses to be used in the classroom environments through NCL at subsidised rates.

NCL Solutions provides training to lecturers involved in SUSE Linux curriculum to ensure they have the appropriate skills to teach students.

The universities and colleges can choose to roll out one or more modules of the Novell Certified Linux Professional (NCLP) programme to meet the specific needs of their students.
The programme will run throughout the academic year or semester, and at the end of the course, each student will receive a certificate of completion to provide recognition that they have been trained in SUSE Linux skills and have the theoretical knowledge to manage a SUSE Linux network environment.

They can then sit for the NCLP certification that is internationally recognised and highly respected by worldwide vendors, employers and IT professionals.

"Linux and Open Source have become mainstream and increasingly used in the public and private sectors in Malaysia, as well as in the rest of the region," said Novell Asia Pacific president Maarten Koster.

originated by new straits times